Casselman River Bridge State Park

Casselman River Bridge State Park is located near Grantsville, Maryland on historic National Road (Route 40). The park spans four acres. It is known for it’s stone bridge, which was one of a kind when it was built in 1813. This park is perfect for anglers, history nuts, and kids. Spruce Forest Artisan Village and Penn Alps Restaurant and Craft Shop are located next to the park.

Grab a picnic basket and enjoy the day in Casselman River Bridge State Park!

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For more information, click here or call 301-895-5453.

 

 

Past and present intersect in Grantsville

This stretch of U.S. 40 in Garrett County includes an artisan village, a stone bridge and a restaurant with a lot of character

June 17, 2014 | By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun

GRANTSVILLE — — In a cabin built in the 1750s, just a few hundred feet from a 201-year-old stone bridge across the quiet Casselman River, a man sits at a slab of a wooden table, an array of carving tools spread before him.

The rush of traffic from nearby Alternate U.S. 40, also known as Route 40, does not bother Gary Yoder. Nor does the “thump-thump-thump” of the weaving loom from the cabin next door.

The most celebrated crafter of wooden bird sculptures in Western Maryland is too engrossed to notice.

“What I do is more like an addiction than a career — a healthy one, I hope,” he says, glancing up from a hawk feather he’s carving from a piece of basswood.

Yoder has been practicing his craft at the Spruce Forest Artisans Village — a cluster of working artists’ studios a mile from downtown Grantsville — for 42 of his 55 years.

More here.

Where to go: Casselman River Bridge State Park, Md.

Sunday, October 16, 2011

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

• What to do: When the National Road was a major route to everywhere west of the Appalachian Mountains, the Casselman River Bridge was considered a marvel of technology. When completed in 1813, the 80-foot bridge was the longest single-span stone arch in the United States. Some thought it wouldn’t stand for long, but the bridge carried foot traffic, animals, carriages, wagon and ultimately automobiles and trucks until 1933. It’s no longer open to vehicular traffic. The 4-acre park, east of Grantsville in Garrett County in Maryland’s northern panhandle, is a popular attraction for photographers, fly anglers and history buffs.

• Contact: 301-895-5453.

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11289/1182256-140.stm#ixzz1bFVc98es

Buying or selling real estate in Garrett County or Deep Creek Lake, Maryland? Call Jay Ferguson of Railey Realty for all of your real estate needs! I take great pride in referrals, and I assure you, I will take great care of your friends, family & colleagues!

877-563-5350 – toll free

Info Meeting On Casselman River Set In Grantsville

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Jul. 28, 2011

The Youghiogheny River Watershed Association (YRWA) and the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) – Abandoned Mine Lands Division will hold a public information meeting on the Casselman River Watershed Remediation Plan next Thursday, Aug. 4, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at Grantsville Town Hall, 171 Hill Street. All interested persons are invited to attend.

The meeting will focus on the plan developed by the MDE Baltimore staff in conjunction with the Abandoned Mine Lands Division (formerly the Bureau of Mines). According to James “Smokey” Stanton, YRWA chairman, the plan provides a comprehensive watershed restoration strategy for the Casselman River Watershed with respect to non-point sources of acidity. The intent of the plan and associated projects is to establish a comprehensive approach to assessment and eventual pollution abatement and mitigation of existing water quality problems, Stanton said.

The MDE – Abandoned Mine Lands Division expects work to begin in the watershed this fall, as early as October. Representatives of the Abandoned Mine Lands Division will present the watershed restoration plan in a brief PowerPoint presentation. Representatives of MDE from the EPA 319 grant program in Baltimore will participate and be available to answer questions.

The Casselman River flows north from its headwaters near Savage River State Forest to the Pennsylvania state line, and lies within the Monongahela River Watershed, a part of the Ohio River drainage basin. The Casselman is a high quality mountain stream noted for its populations of brook trout, stonecats, and hellbenders in the less impaired parts. The tributaries of the Casselman Watershed have shown significant reductions in the native brook trout population as a result of acid mine drainage from abandoned mine discharges, as well as episodic atmospheric deposition.

The Casselman River Watershed Remediation Plan consists of several phases, including identifying sources and major discharges, generating a list of impaired stream segments, developing a database of segments, prioritizing impaired streams, and developing solutions to correct the impairments.

More here.

Buying or selling real estate in Garrett County or Deep Creek Lake, Maryland? Call Jay Ferguson of Railey Realty for all of your real estate needs! I take great pride in referrals, and I assure you, I will take great care of your friends, family & colleagues!

877-563-5350 – toll free

MDE approves permit for Casselman mine

Authorization moves project past final development hurdle

Megan Miller
The Cumberland Times-News Fri Oct 01, 2010, 07:59 AM EDT

— GRANTSVILLE — The Maryland Department of the Environment issued a permit this week that essentially cleared the last procedural hurdle preventing development of a coal mine under the Casselman River.

The surface water discharge permit will allow Maryland Energy Resources LLC, a subsidiary of the Indiana, Pa.-based Joseph Peles Coal Company, to discharge an average of 500,000 gallons of mine drainage per day, along with variable volumes of stormwater, into the North Branch of the Casselman from an underground mine.

The proposed mine is comprised of more than 4,600 acres and includes 15 million tons of recoverable coal.

The possibility of development of a coal mine in that area has been discussed openly by public officials since at least 2008. The Casselman Basin, which runs beneath Grantsville, is estimated to contain about 116 million tons of coal, according to MDE.

Maryland Energy Resources applied for the discharge permit in February 2009, but a determination was delayed partly because of concerns expressed by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources over the mine’s potential impact on two state endangered species, the hellbender salamander and stonecat fish.

Members of the public echoed those concerns in a May 19 public hearing. They also voiced concerns about acid mine drainage and other issues related to monitoring the mine discharge.

MDE’s written response to public comment stated that the mine will be designed and operated in such a way that water “will not passively flow out of the mine.” The agency stated that management of acid mine drainage and erosion and sediment controls is covered under a separate permit already issued for the project by the Bureau of Mines.

MDE also stated that DNR withdrew its jeopardy opinion regarding the endangered species after reviewing the final conditions of the permit.

Any person who is “adversely affected” by MDE’s decision has until Oct. 30 to request a judicial review in Garrett County Circuit Court, according to the agency.

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Water permit ‘one step closer’ to Casselman mine opening

Kevin Spradlin
Cumberland Times-News

CUMBERLAND — The Casselman Mine is “one step closer to opening” after the Maryland Department of the Environment approved the operator’s application for a water appropriation and use permit.

Joseph Peles, managing member of Maryland Energy Resources LLC, made the statement in an e-mail to the Times-News in response to an inquiry about the issue.

The permit is effective July 1, but the timeline of when Maryland Energy Resources might begin work remained uncertain as of Tuesday afternoon. The proposed underground mine in Grantsville is comprised of more than 4,600 acres and includes 15 million tons of recoverable coal.

The permit authorizes the company to withdraw a daily average of 342,000 gallons of water on a yearly basis. The water, to be taken from the coal seam of the Allegheny formation, is to be used for dust suppression and dewatering of a deep coal mine.

“This is the final agency determination,” said Jay Apperson, a spokesman with MDE. “There is no further opportunity for administrative review.”

There are, however, at least two more potential roadblocks which the Indiana, Pa.-based company needs to clear.

First, MDE has yet to rule on the company’s application for a surface water permit. Approximately 100 people attended a public hearing last month about that issue. Second, an interested party can petition for judicial review in Garrett County Circuit Court, Apperson said.

Under the water appropriation and use permit issued June 17 to Maryland Energy Resources, officials from MDE’s Water Management Administration may conduct inspections and evaluations to ensure permit compliance. The company must submit semiannual withdrawal reports to MDE.

Water withdrawal must begin within two years of the permit’s issuance or the permit will expire.

The company is responsible for providing a temporary replacement for any residential or commercial water supply that might be “unreasonably interrupted as a result of this water appropriation.” If that fails to resolve the situation, the company must provide a permanent replacement “of a quality and in sufficient quantity for the required uses within a reasonable length of time, not to exceed 90 days.”

Short- and long-term fixes would be installed at the expense of Maryland Energy Resources.

If a private well or spring is “unreasonably impacted” by mining operations, the company is to provide a new or retrofitted well.

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Many Attend Public Hearing For Casselman River Coal Mine Proj.

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May. 20, 2010

Approximately 100 people attended the public hearing last evening at Grantsville Elementary School concerning the proposed underground coal mine in the Grantsville area. The hearing was scheduled by the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) to address a tentative determination for a permit to discharge water from the mine.

The permit application was made by Maryland Energy Resources LLC, Indiana, Pa. It involves the discharge of an average of 500,000 gallons per day of mine drainage and variable volumes of storm water from the proposed mine. The site is located along Durst Road, southwest of Grantsville to the north branch of the Casselman River.

Michael Richardson served as the hearing officer for the MDE. He noted that the hearing was ordered in accordance with the code of Maryland regulations, and its purpose was to provide the opportunity for the public to submit comments for the record concerning the permit.

First, there was a time for open discussion and questions from the public. Following the discussion, persons were invited to make a formal comment for the record, and comments were recorded by a court reporter.

Persons were also invited to submit written comments for the record as well. Richardson explained that all comments will be reviewed before a final decision is made concerning the permit.

Written comments will be accepted until Wednesday, May 26. They can be sent to the Maryland Department of the Environment, Water Management Administration, 1800 Washington Blvd., Baltimore, MD 21230-1708, Attn: Michael Richardson. For more information, persons may call 800-633-6101.

Read the rest here.

If you are thinking of buying or selling real estate in Garrett County or Deep Creek Lake, Maryland, call Jay Ferguson of Railey Realty for all of your real estate needs! 877-563-5350

Hearing Planned About Grantsville Coal Mine Permit

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May. 6, 2010

A public hearing concerning a tentative determination for a permit to discharge water from a proposed underground coal mine near Grantsville will be held on Wednesday, May 19, at 6:30 p.m. at the Grantsville Elementary School cafeteria.
The hearing was scheduled by the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE).

Maryland Energy Resources LLC, Indiana, Pa., submitted the application for a permit to discharge an average of 500,000 gallons per day of mine drainage and variable volumes of storm water from the proposed mine. The site is located along Durst Road, southwest of Grantsville to the north branch of the Casselman River.

According to the MDE, the permit requires immediate suspension of the discharge in the event of mine drainage temperature or pH exceedance, wastewater operator certification, biomonitoring, restrictions on the use of treatment chemicals, best management practices, a storm water pollution prevention plan, and additional requirements for acid mine drainage. The permit also requires a study of stream flow velocity to support an authorization for a higher flow limit for mine drainage.

MDE noted that it has been determined that at least two state listed endangered species habitats are situated downstream from the discharges that are authorized under this permit.

Read the rest here.

If you are thinking of buying or selling real estate in Garrett County or Deep Creek Lake, Maryland, call Jay Ferguson of Railey Realty for all of your real estate needs! 877-563-5350

Casselman, Potomac River fishing

Mr. Neuland mentions fly fishing for trout in Garrett County, specifically the Casselman & Potomac Rivers. Garrett County is famous for its trout fishing streams & rivers. From the Frederick News Post:

Town Creek: The water was pristine
Originally published March 28, 2010

By Dan Neuland
Today’s Sportsman

I HAVE LIVED in Maryland for more than 20 years and am ashamed to admit that I had never fished Town Creek until last year. For years, I have traveled I-68 through Allegany County on my way to fly fish the popular trout fisheries in Garrett County, driving right over Town Creek without stopping to sample the waters.
Last March, I took the opportunity to do a little early morning turkey scouting in Green Ridge State Forest, and combined the outing with some afternoon fly fishing in the delayed-harvest trout fishing area on Town Creek.

Before leaving home, I checked the Maryland Freshwater Sportfishing Guide online for information on tackle restrictions and printed the driving directions from the Department of Natural Resources website.

Like the other delayed harvest areas in western Maryland, such as the Casselman River and the North Branch of the Potomac River, Town Creek is managed as catch and release with artificial lures or flies only restrictions in the fall, late winter and throughout the spring.

Read the rest of the article here.

If you are thinking of buying or selling real estate in Garrett County or Deep Creek Lake, Maryland, call Jay Ferguson of Railey Realty for all of your real estate needs! 877-563-5350