Garrett College leads state in enrollment growth

The Garrett County Republican

McHENRY — Garrett College led all Maryland community colleges in enrollment growth during the spring 2020 semester, according to recently released statewide enrollment data.

The college led the state in credit hour enrollment growth, increasing the number of credit hours taken by its students by 5.85 percent in spring 2020 compared to spring 2019. Garrett finished the spring enrollment period with 6,190.75 credit hours, 342 more credit hours than in spring 2019.

Garrett was third in headcount enrollment growth, behind neighboring Allegany College of Maryland (7.6 percent) and Baltimore City Community College (6 percent.) It grew from 569 to 605 students, an increase of 6.33 percent.

“This is a very impressive enrollment performance for the college,” said Dr. Richard Midcap, Garrett College’s president. “It’s a testament to our faculty and staff. We consistently emphasize that enrollment is everyone’s business — and everyone deserves credit for this accomplishment.”

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Rutherford checks six local state parks off his ‘Bucket List’

The Garrett County Republican

OAKLAND — Maryland Lt. Gov. Boyd Rutherford was able to check six more state parks off his “State Park Bucket List” while visiting Garrett County last week.

Over Friday and Saturday, he visited Sang Run State Park, Youghiogeny Wild River Natural Environment Area, Herrington Manor State Park, Swallow Falls State Park, Deep Creek Lake State Park and Deep Creek Lake Natural Resources Management Area.

“It was great to cross a few more state parks off my #LGStateParkBucketList this weekend in Garrett County,” Rutherford posted on his Facebook page. “Western Maryland has some of the most beautiful and scenic public lands in the state, especially in the winter if you can withstand the cold! Each location has its own unique history and features, and they are all well worth a visit any time of year.”

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5 Favorite Oakland Winter Fest Activities

TAYLOR-MADE DEEP CREEK VACATIONS & SALES BLOG

Oakland Winter Fest is held the Saturday of President’s Day weekend each year. It is a great way to celebrate the season with friends and family. You can stroll through the historic downtown as you enjoy delicious food and fun activities. For the second year, you can buy a $15 ticket for the Wine Walk. You can taste approximately 12 different wines, which will be available at a number of locations throughout the town.

I picked out 5 of my favorite Oakland Winter Fest activities that you absolutely don’t want to miss!

WATCH MASTER ICE CARVER BILL SANDUSKY CREATE BEAUTIFUL SCULPTURES.
Each year, Bill travels from Erie, PA to create more than 30 unique ice carvings that decorate the sidewalks. You can watch his demonstrations or check out one of the interactive sculptures.

TAKE A HORSE DRAWN SLEIGH RIDE.
Take a free sleigh ride through the streets of this picturesque small town. It is a classic winter experience that you will always remember.

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Mountain bike trails planned for Broadford Park

The Garrett County Republican

OAKLAND — Members of Oakland Town Council gave their blessing Monday for a group of bicyclists to raise money to develop a system of mountain bike trails at Broadford Park.

Aaron Hordubay, representing the Garrett County Composite Mountain Biking Team, presented a conceptual design of trail routes that would span the length and width of the park with paths for different difficulty levels.

The group last year suggested development of the trail system to fill a gap, as some parks provide smooth, paved trails while others have technical, “aggressive” paths.

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Record participants hike in new year Across Maryland

From The Garrett County Republican

ANNAPOLIS — The Maryland Department of Natural Resources reports about 5,000 hikers took advantage of sunny and mild weather New Year’s Day, joining the DNR in the state’s annual First Day Hikes initiative.

Hikers logged more than 10,000 miles on trails in parks and public lands all across Maryland, according to DNR.

Park rangers, staff and volunteers guided hikers of all experience levels ringing in the new year on the trail. With 43 hikes at more than 30 locations, the Maryland Park Service registered 3,834 hikers participating in guided hikes, while 1,152 people hiked 1,516 miles on their own — a grand total of 4,986 hikers, not counting many who didn’t check in with a ranger. Even more people hiked in Maryland’s state forests, wildlife management areas and other public lands.

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Garrett College honors STEM benefactor

From The Garrett County Republican

McHENRY — The Daniel E. Offutt III STEM Center was formally dedicated Saturday morning at Garrett College, with college, county and state officials praising the late Oakland native and philanthropist for his enduring commitment to STEM education.

“The Offutt Trust endowment is just the latest gift Mr. Offutt has provided Garrett College,” said Don Morin, chairman of the Garrett College Board of Trustees, in reference to the $2 million STEM endowment provided late last year by the trust. “Speaking on behalf of the Garrett College Board of Trustees, I want to express our appreciation for the continued commitment to Garrett College and STEM education that Mr. Offutt’s estate gift represents.”

The college is authorized to use the income generated by the endowment equally for STEM scholarships and STEM equipment upgrades and faculty development.

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Communities that found a better way

From The Messenger

Klamath County, Oregon. Algoma, Wisconsin. Allen County, Kansas. Williamson, West Virgina. Garrett County, Maryland.

What, you might ask, do these places have in common? What they have in common is that they are all rural communities that have been recognized as Culture of Health Prize winners by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the largest health-related philanthropic organization in the United States.

These communities have decided that the status quo was not good enough and that they wanted a better future for themselves and their families. They all took different paths to change, but the one thing they all did was to decide, as communities, to try.

Willamson has a lot in common with Madisonville. It’s a coal town that had to adapt to a changing economy. To fight the decline of their community, the residents got together and identified their needs and, just as importantly, their available resources. They formed a community betterment corporation called “Sustainable Williamson” to coordinate their resources and their efforts to improve community healthcare, housing, energy sustainability, education and tourism. If you read the Sustainable Williamson action plan (Google it), it reads almost like you could scratch out “Williamson” and write in “Madisonville.”

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