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County Commissioners Announce Special Public Hearing – June 28, 2022

Garrett County Government

County Commissioners Announce Special Public Hearing – June 28, 2022
Last Updated on Jun 14, 2022 at 12:40pm | Board of Commissioners
PUBLIC NOTICE

The Board of Garrett County Commissioners will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, June 28, 2022, at 3:00 p.m. in the Commissioner’s Meeting Room, Room 209, 203 South Fourth Street, Courthouse, Oakland, Maryland. The purpose of the meeting is to review and take public comment on the following ordinance(s):

GARRETT COUNTY FIRE MARSHAL
Draft Ordinance – Garrett County Fire Marshal
AN ACT CONCERNING the Garrett County Fire Marshal FOR THE PURPOSE of authorizing the appointment of a Fire Marshal for Garrett County, Maryland; establishing the scope of the duties as well as the administration and implementation of the Office of the Fire Marshall for Garrett County, Maryland, and authorizing the Office of Fire Marshal to investigate the origin, cause and circumstances of fires, explosions, and hazardous materials emergencies in Garrett County.

GARRETT COUNTY POLICE ACCOUNTABILITY BOARD
Draft Ordinance – Garrett Count y Police Accountability Board
AN ACT CONCERNING the Garrett County Police Accountability Board FOR THE PURPOSE of establishing a Police Accountability Board for Garrett County, Maryland; establishing the scope of the duties as well as the administration and implementation of the Garrett County Police Accountability Board and authorizing the Garrett County Police Accountability Board to work with law enforcement agencies and the county government to improve matters of policing in Garrett County.

BUILDING REGULATIONS
Draft Ordinance – Building Regulations
AN ACT CONCERNING the Garrett County Fire Prevention Code; FOR THE PURPOSE of adopting and implementing a Fire Prevention Code for Garrett County, Maryland; providing for the scope, administration, and implementation thereof; providing for inspection and other fees; providing for protection against fires and the removal of fire hazards; providing for appointment of inspectors to enforce the Fire Prevention Code and establishing penalties for violations thereof.

Garrett County Gran Fondo

Gran fondo guide

The Garrett County Gran Fondo has a ride for everyone from the recreational cyclist to seasoned professionals with five supported ride options. The 125 mile “Diabolical Double Metric”, the 105 mile “Savage Century”, the 63 mile “Masochistic Metric”, and the 44 mile “Fabulous 44” all contain very steep and challenging hills. The “Garrett’s Greatest 25” includes hills but is appropriate for the recreational cyclist not desiring to undertake the more extreme Gran Fondo ride offerings.

7 separate timed KOM climbs encompass a total of 11.8 miles and 4400′ elevation gain.  A true climbing test!

The Garrett County Gran Fondo “Diabolical Double” was selected in 2009 by Rapha Continental as one of the top 25 Epic Rides in North America and riders unanimously agreed the ride ranked was “one of the most stunning and demanding rides of the summer”. At 125 miles and 16,500 feet of climbing, this ride is an extreme challenge on par with any single day ride in the world, including the European climbing classics such as Etape du Tour, la Marmotte, and the classic Italian Gran Fondos. Compact cranks or triples are very strongly encouraged.

The “Diabolical Double” – the feature event of the Garrett County Gran Fondo, the Diabolical Double is a true, extreme epic on par with European climbing classics such as Etape du Tour, la Marmotte, and the classic Italian Gran Fondos. At 125 miles and 16,500 feet of climbing, the Diabolical Double is an all-day affair that is an extreme challenge for even the most fit rider. Included in Rapha Continental’s 2009 tour of the Top 25 Epic Rides in North America, and called by the Rapha riders “one of the most demanding and stunning rides of the summer”, the Diabolical Double is destined to become a true North American cycling classic.

The “Savage Century” – at 105 miles and 12,700 feet of climbing, the Savage Century is a very challenging century ride in its own right despite playing second fiddle to the Diabolical Double. The Savage Century shares the first 59 miles and final 15 miles of the Diabolical Double route.

The “Masochistic Metric” – at 63 miles and 8000 feet of climbing, the Masochistic Metric can stake its claim as the toughest metric century route in North America. The Masochistic Metric shares the first 47 miles of the Diabolical Double and Savage Century routes and includes some of the most stunning rural scenery and vistas you are ever to encounter on a bike as well as the vast majority of the steepest climbs encountered in the Savage Century and Diabolical Double routes

The “Fabulous 44” – at 44 miles and 4800 feet of climbing, the “Fabulous 44” is an excellent option for anyone looking for a longer, more challenging ride than the “Garrett’s Greatest 25”, but is not ready to undertake the extreme challenge of the Masochistic Metric Century.

The “Garrett’s Greatest 25” – A beautiful 25 mile ride through the rolling Garrett County farmland with a challenging 3 mile climb to the finish atop Wisp Mountain.

espite the extreme nature of the some of the Garrett County Gran Fondo rides, there are no qualifying standard or time cutoff restrictions beyond event closure at dusk. The Gran Fondo rides include supply stations, tech/sag support and riders will be provided detailed cue sheets and elevation profiles. Even so, participants should prepare to be self-sufficient for up to 25 slow, hilly miles between checkpoints and supply stations.

To read the full article click here.

Tourism sees record increases in westernmost county

 Cumberland Times-News

MCHENRY — Deep Creek Lake and Garrett County saw record increases in tourism during 2021 with a 34.3% increase in county accommodations sales, an 8.1% increase in visitors to the Garrett County Chamber of Commerce website, a 56.8% increase in guests to the Visitors Center and a 45.7% increase in Garrett County Visitor Guide requests.

Due to lodging growth between 2017 and 2019, the chamber secured a 10.4% increase in state tourism marketing match grant funds for fiscal 2022.

“By utilizing innovative and strategic marketing strategies, Garrett County was able to avoid the fate of many tourism areas who saw drastic drops in tourism during the pandemic,” said Sarah Duck, vice president of tourism and marketing of the chamber. “We have confidence in our marketing strategies and these stats validate that our efforts are effective and yielding strong results for our community. However, as tourism begins to rebound across the country and the world, tourism advertising has become more competitive than ever, so we must continue to be inventive and deliberate in reaching our audience with the right message.”

To read the full article click here.

Lake Effect: Revisting the Genius Mountain Maryland Visit of Albert Einstein — From Allegany Magazine’s January 2022 edition

Allegany Magazine

Many people consider Albert Einstein the smartest man who ever lived. Yet when this man who knew almost everything needed to unwind one warm season during the war, the vacation spot he smartly chose was in the Mountains of Maryland — Deep Creek Lake to be more specific.

Einstein vacationed for two weeks in September 1946 at the lake. He was seeking a place where he could find escape from the unwanted media that wrote about how his theories had led to the creation of the atomic bomb. That giant brain needed a rest. Even people who are considered the smartest of all time get criticized, as it turns out.

And John Steiding – a resident of Midland here in Allegany County invited Einstein to take a vacation at the lake. Steiding was a chemist at the Celanese plant at the time and came to know Einstein through a co-worker’s wife, who was sculpting the great man’s bust.

“Einstein, who wasn’t very tall, found it uncomfortable to pose for the artwork since his feet would not touch the floor. Steiding, being a handyman, made a footstool for Einstein,” according to Francis Tam in an article called “Einstein in Western Maryland.”

Besides being able to relax out of the national spotlight for a while, Einstein was also able to have Dr. Frank Wilson examine him for an aneurysm of the aorta of the abdomen. And this news also could be kept from the prying public eyes – and a news media at the time that was looking for any reason at all to be critical of the man.

Einstein stayed at Dr. Wilson’s lake cottage, named the “Mar-Jo-Lodge” for two weeks. “He took daily walks along the lake, frequently stopping to chat with strangers who had no idea who he was. He was sometimes seen fishing and also bird-watching with binoculars. He never skipped a meal but was a light eater. He drank a lot of water and lemonade; his favorite vegetable was fresh corn-on-the-cob from Garrett County,” Tam wrote.

In particular, Einstein loved sailing, either with friends or alone.

“During one of his many hours spent on the lake with Steiding, Einstein remarked that ‘here you can get nearer to God,’” reported the Cumberland News.

Born in 1879, Einstein was a German theoretical physicist, widely credited to be one of the greatest physicists of all time. He is best known for developing the theory of relativity, but he also made important contributions to the development of the theory of quantum mechanics. Relativity and quantum mechanics are together the two pillars of modern physics. “E = mc2” — which arises from his relativity theory, has been dubbed “the world’s most famous equation.” Einstein received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics “for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect.” a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.

As word began to get out that the great Albert Einstein was vacationiong at Maryland’s “Best Kept Secret,” people began to look for him – hoping to run into the man, chat, take a photo or get an autograph. On these days, when he knew he was being sought after as a celebrity, Einstein sought solace on the water.

“People would realize that he wasn’t around, go searching for him, and find him in Harry Muma’s little sailboat, ‘single-handing,’ on the Turkey Neck inlet,” according to the Garrett County Historical Society’s “Deep Creek Lake, Past and Present.”

During a visit, Steiding’s brother Fred asked Einstein to explain his famous theory of relativity in layman’s terms.

“Put it this way,” reportedly said Einstein, “If you sit on a park bench with your sweetheart, an hour seems like a minute. If you sit on a hot stove by mistake, a minute seems like an hour.”

Einstein later said that his vacation at Deep Creek Lake was “one of the most restful and zestful vacations.”

When the vacation ended, Einstein showed himself to be a generous guest, giving Blair Thompson, who had attended him during the vacation, a $50 gratuity, which would equate to more than $1,000 today.

Following the vacation, he was back to work. In October of that year, he wrote that the United Nations should “form a world government that maintained peace under the threat of nuclear devastation,” according to Ze’ev Rosenkranz in “The Einstein Scrapbook.” Einstein also published his papers on his unified field theory in the 1950s.

On April 17 1955, Albert Einstein experienced internal bleeding caused by the rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm – the same one that caused him seek refuge in Garrett County nine years before. The condition had also been reinforced surgically by Dr. Rudolph Nissen in 1948. Einstein took the draft of a speech he was preparing for a television appearance commemorating the state of Israel’s seventh anniversary with him to the hospital, but he did not live to complete it.

Einstein refused surgery, saying, “I want to go when I want. It is tasteless to prolong life artificially. I have done my share; it is time to go. I will do it elegantly.” And so he did. Einstein died in Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center on April 18, 1955 at the age of 76.

To the world, Einstein’s vacation at Deep Creek Lake remained a secret until a reporter with the Cumberland News interviewed Robbie Steiding – the son of John Stieding – and published the story of the visit in 1979.

Western Maryland Scenic 1309 receives FRA approval

From Trains.com

RIDGELEY, W.Va. — The Federal Railroad Administration Thursday approved Western Maryland Scenic Railroad 2-6-6-2 No. 1309 for service, officials of the Cumberland, Md.-based tourist railroad tell Trains News Wire. The last Baldwin built for domestic service in 1949 immediately becomes the world’s largest operating Mallet on a 17-mile mountain railroad that was once the Western Maryland main line, including iconic Helmstetter’s Curve.

The locomotive will immediately begin its testing and break in period, leading up to its operation on Polar Express trains next month and regular service and special events next winter and spring. The former Chesapeake & Ohio engine only operated in regular service for six years before retirement and was displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore for years before Western Maryland Scenic bought and moved it in 2014. The engine and three cars were running this morning.

The $3.5 million restoration of the large articulated was a monumental task for a tourist railroad of modest means and working in a former Western Maryland car shop. Workers last December pushed to get the engine to the point where it could move on its own for the first time in 64 years and debuted it on Dec. 31. Since then, the shop crew has been chasing down thousands of final details, rebuilding the stoker, and acquiring parts that were difficult to come by during the Covid-19 pandemic. The railroad, which had not run since the 2019 season, also worked to reopen during 2021, which made No. 1309’s restoration a close but still second priority.

The Mallet, which uses its steam twice, was the fabled Baldwin Locomotive Works’ last domestic product in 1949 and is thus a major landmark in U.S. steam locomotive manufacturing.

Crews from railway preservation came from across the U.S. to assist in the final weeks of reassembly, a painstaking and difficult process for a locomotive that received little maintenance in its working life, spent years on display in a humid environment, and was disassembled by a different restoration crew. Its restoration was slowed earlier by an employee’s theft of parts, significant funding challenges, and the immensity and complexity of such a large locomotive.

steam locomotive outside depot
Western Maryland Scenic 2-6-6-2 No. 1309 begins test runs today following FRA approval of the locomotive after an extensive 7-year, $3.5 million restoration. Here it is outside Cumberland Depot. (Walter Scriptunas II photos)
When it begins regular operations, No. 1309 will be the only articulated rod engine in action in the eastern U.S., and the largest steam power in the East. Union Pacific’s Big Boy operates on UP tracks and is a simple articulated, meaning it feeds high-pressure steam to all four cylinders.

No. 1309 will be operated on 17 miles of the former Western Maryland Railway main line from Cumberland, Md., via famous Helmstetter’s Curve, to Frostburg, Md.

Stalled for funding at the end of 2019, the project was at a standstill. In February 2020, Trains Magazine launched the “Steam the Last Baldwin” campaign to raise money to restart the project. Readers responded with more than $275,000 in donations, and the John Emery Rail Heritage Trust made a special mid-year grant of $50,000 to keep work moving forward. The engine was set on its drivers in June 2020, and final reassembly began.

You can read about the final restoration efforts in our special edition, “Steaming the Last Baldwin,” and a companion DVD. Both are available online at the Kalmbach Hobby Store.

62nd-annual Garrett County Agriculture Fair kicks off

The 62nd annual Garrett County Agriculture Fair kicks off with events running for an entire week.

The event will include many competitions, ranging from the judging of farm animals to canned goods, photography and 4-H and school projects.

All exhibit barns will be open to the public beginning at 10 a.m. Monday, the carnvial rides will be open from 1-11 p.m. and various contests/competitions will be held throughout the day. Tuesday will be Senior Citizens Day, with free admission granted for those ages 60 and older. Seniors may ride midway attractions free from 1-5 p.m. The day’s schedule will also include a pet show, a 4-H robotics challenge, and a Barrell Ba$h.

for the rest of the weeks schedule and info click here

330 Red Run Heights Rd. Price Drop

3BR, 2BA home in a spectacular location near lake, state parks & town. Over-sized lot with mature trees and level yard. Plenty of privacy and views of the surrounding mountains. Huge loft area and open living space, eat-in kitchen + island, outbuilding/garage, wrap-around driveway and an impressive workshop in basement. Loads of storage + closet space. Multiple heat sources. Front & rear decking.

for more information click here

Celtic Festival to celebrate 30 Years in Garrett County

FRIENDSVILLE — On the green riverside of Friendsville Community Park, the Garrett County Celtic Festival will once again take place, celebrating for the 30th year the history and traditions of Scots, Irish and Welsh ancestry of the mountaintop.

The event will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. June 2.

For more Information click here.

Photo by Elizabeth Williams

New Listing 111 Cherry Heights Ln.

Well-maintained 5BR Tennessee log home with multiple views of Deep Creek Lake! Custom home offers a spacious kitchen with ample counter space, several open living areas, exposed beams, large bedrooms and attached garage stall for storage of tools, toys, gear. Impressive exterior decking and covered porch area. 5 minutes to Wisp, dock rentals & other popular lake activities.. Furnishings included!

For more Information click here