1923 Chevy on Display at Transportation Museum

Jun. 28, 2012

One of the latest additions at the Garrett County Historical Society Transportation Museum in Oakland is this mint-condition 1923 Chevrolet Superior. The vehicle was reportedly confiscated by law enforcement officials a number of years ago in a drug sting and eventually purchased by Eric Belldina of Masontown, W.Va. David Holman, also of Masontown, did the restoration work.


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The car is on loan by Belldina, and can be seen at the museum anytime between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and noon to 3 p.m. on Sunday.

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Garrett hits impasse with wind setbacks

Commission uncertain how to carry on with land use ordinance

Elaine Blaisdell Cumberland Times-News

OAKLAND — After three motions, Garrett County commissioners came to an impasse in regard to a decision on how to proceed with the public process of a draft land use management ordinance, a portion of which deals with wind turbine setbacks.

During Tuesday’s meeting, Chairman Jim Raley made a motion to table the ordinance so a discussion could occur with the local delegation to address enacting wind setback legislation during the next General Assembly session.

Although Raley’s motion was seconded by Commissioner Gregan Crawford, it was then opposed by commissioners Crawford and Robert Gatto.

“Commissioner Crawford did second that motion, which gave me the opportunity to provide my explanation as to what I wanted to do,” said Raley, who said, according to parliamentary procedures, a motion can be explained once it is seconded. “While Commissioner Crawford wanted to hear what I said, he was not necessarily saying … that he was in agreement with it.”

During the meeting, Raley said he wanted one more chance to speak with the delegation about wind legislation.

“This is the last effort. The state has to understand that they have to put in place some form of protection,” said Raley. “They want to heavily regulate and almost bring a halt to shale gas in this area but they want to put on blinders when it comes to wind energy.”

Raley said that at last year’s Maryland Association of Counties conference, the Maryland Energy Administration talked about the greatness of wind energy and Maryland’s energy future but failed to mention the development of shale gas.

“Many organizations have worked heavily to try to regulate coal out of business. Shame on us,” said Raley.

Raley said regulations could be made statewide in partnering with local legislators, possibly the Maryland Energy Administration and other state agencies.

Crawford said he thought going to the legislation wouldn’t help.

“We have tried to go to the legislature for five to six years now and get this issue addressed. It’s been ineffective,” said Crawford “Last year we got very close but time ran out.”

Crawford made a motion to forward the ordinance to the planning commission and Gatto made an opposing motion, both of which died due to a lack of a second.

“As far as the document, I’m not in favor of it going forward to the planning commission. I think it is too far-reaching, in particular on wind,” said Gatto.

Raley echoed Gatto’s statements, “This document unfortunately reaches far beyond wind energy. It reaches into land uses that farmers have told me they don’t like, business owners have told me they don’t like and landowners have told me they don’t like. I have to figure out some way to get some reasonable setbacks and compliant standards for this (wind) industry.”

The commissioners have received many comments in regard to wind energy projects and the ordinance.

There were petitions with 94 signatures supporting the Annapolis-based Synergics 24-wind turbine project on Four Mile Ridge, according to Raley. In addition, the commission received petitions with 642 signatures opposing the draft land use management ordinance. The commission also received advisory opinions from Maryland Energy Administration, Chesapeake Climate Action Network, Mid Atlantic Renewable, Energy Clipper and EDP Renewables.

“Shame on Maryland. Shame on us for not having something in place before this whole thing took off,” said Raley. “That’s unfortunate because we are amongst projects that already exist and some projects are in the pipeline.”

County attorney Gorman Getty addressed the legal aspects of the vested rights of those projects in different stages, in regard to the ordinance.

Maryland law reflects that when spade is to the earth and there is a physical change to property in a manner that is lawful, with or without regulations, a vested right or interest is acquired under then existing circumstances, said Getty. The law doesn’t protect those that are in the discussion stages or are acquiring easement, according to Getty. Those that have acquired a permit and begun construction would have a vested right.

Raley said he had read the public’s comments and had visited the Pinnacle Wind Project on Green Mountain near Keyser and didn’t think the county is ready for comprehensive zoning.

“Shame on West Virginia and shame on that developer (of Pinnacle) because those turbines are noisy, they are irritating,” said Raley, adding that he once visited on a foggy day and could not see the wind turbines, but could still hear them. “I understand that is the fault of the turbine and the one that has been chosen to be put in place. Obviously, that company is paying the price to deaden that sound. I think it’s no secret that this board of commissioners does not embrace — as a group — wind energy.”

Because no decision was made, the commissioners will have to regroup to address the ordinance, said Raley.

If the ordinance were to go forward, there would still be time to address public issues and concerns before it could become effective, said Crawford.

Contact Elaine Blaisdell at eblaisdell@times-news.com

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Land use ordinance infringes on property rights

Cumberland Times-News

Dear Sirs:

I am a business owner and a Garrett County land owner. My quarry is located off Avilton-Lonaconing Road. My family has been in this business for generations providing all types of stones for schools, churches, playgrounds, home as well as gravel for road construction.

I have attended various meetings at the courthouse, and I must say that I failed to understand any sound reasoning behind the massive regulations that you have proposed.

The issue relating to windmills is on two pages; what about the other 83 pages of regulations? Who asked for these regulations and curbs on our property rights?

This is a fact that Garrett County is a poor county. It is no richer than when my dad was running our family quarry.

No new major construction is happening; no manufacturers are moving into our area, the county has no major development works planned. The only possibility is wind development and maybe gas drilling. The setback that you have proposed will kill any wind development in Garrett County just like it did in Allegany County.

The two operating wind projects on Backbone Mountain are paying about $1.9 million in personal property taxes in addition to $700,000 in real property taxes for year 2012. This revenue stream will continue for the next 30 years.

Additional wind development projects are proposed in Garrett County that could bring over $3 million a year in addition tax revenues per year. These wind projects will bring much needed construction jobs and the developers will be pumping millions into the local economy.

No wonder, in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, counties and boroughs are encouraging wind development.

In the previous commissioners’ meeting, I asked the question: Is there anything wrong with the operating wind mills that require you to ask for these setbacks? I did not get the answer from the commissioners.

We all heard the Clipper representative saying that most of Backbone mountain wind turbines would have been eliminated with your proposed setbacks.

Like the Backbone experience, why can’t we have the wind developers follow the prudent wind industry practices and work with neighboring property owners and follow the state safety and noises regulations?

From properties it is turbine height plus 10 feet, which is about 500 feet. From occupied structure it is about 1,000 feet. Why can we let the wind companies follow it as they did for the Backbone projects?

The remaining 83 pages of the land use ordinance draft is all an infringement on my property rights. I have a right to develop my property as I choose.

If windmills can be considered on my lands, I will embrace it besides providing gravel, stones and services for these projects. I fully support for construction work and jobs for our county residents. My neighbors will benefit too from the economic activities in the area and with additional taxes the county can continue functioning without eliminating of services and closing of schools.

I vote for total rejection and elimination of the proposed Land Use Management Ordinance — county wide zoning.

Jeremy Preston

Lonaconing

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GLAF Offering Young Artists Workshop In July

Jun. 21, 2012

The Garrett Lakes Arts Festival (GLAF) will again offer its Young Artists Workshop open to youth entering 7th grade through graduating high school seniors. The camp is again under the instruction of Laura Stutzman, illustrator and graphic designer.

This is Stutzman’s 14th year to teach the visual arts workshop, designed for students with a desire to learn more about drawing and painting.

“The level of study is both ambitious and challenging with opportunities to try advanced mediums, work collaboratively, and raise their level of skill,” said Mary Callis, executive director of GLAF. “Exercises in scaling art, life drawing, and color theory round out a week of discovery and camaraderie, with a bonus of well-earned confidence for students to take away.”

The week will culminate in an evening show on Friday, open to the public.

Stutzman is a graduate of the Art Institute of Pittsburgh, with a degree in visual communications. Her career began with the Pittsburgh Press in its promotion department, followed by a move to Washington, D.C., where she worked in advertising as an illustrator and designer.

In 1982, Laura co-founded Eloqui, a local illustration company she shares with her husband Mark. She has been a freelance illustrator since the founding of the company, which is headquartered in Mtn. Lake Park

“She is best known for her confident, painterly style that shows uniquely in today’s market,” Callis said. “With a blend of traditional approach and contemporary imagery, Laura’s paintings have adorned numerous magazines, posters, books, and annual reports.”

Stutzman regularly takes on private portrait commissions as well, when time permits.

“The roots of my approach to painting is seeded in the Golden Age of illustration and impressionist from the turn of the century,” Stutzman said. “Impressionists Sargent and Hassam, along with the narrative sensibilities of illustrators Dean Cornwell and N.C. Wyeth, inspire my desire to paint.”

The registration fee for the workshop is $125, which includes instruction, the cost of materials, and lunch, which is provided by the Garrett County Board of Education at the Laker Café.

For more information about the GLAF Young Artists’ Workshop, persons may visit the GLAF web site artsandentertainment.org or call the GLAF office at 301-387-3082.

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Garrett County Chamber of Commerce supports shale gas development

Elaine Blaisdell Cumberland Times-News

OAKLAND — The Garrett County Chamber of Commerce has adopted a position in support of Marcellus shale gas development and encourages the Maryland Department of the Environment to authorize the process of allowing for the safe extraction in the county, according to a white paper released last month.

Gov. Martin O’Malley’s Marcellus Shale Safe Drilling Initiative Advisory Commission’s final report is set to be released in August 2014.

The white paper explains the chamber’s position and was distributed as a way to educate its members, according to Nicole Christian, president and CEO of the chamber, who is also a member of the Garrett County Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Advisory Committee.

“We recognize the impact that our nation’s energy dependency has had in shaping our domestic and foreign policy,” states the paper. “Although currently no national energy policy exists, we feel that it is likely that we will see a shift in favor of greater reliance on domestic energy sources, including natural gas. Our county is uniquely positioned to provide to our state and country the prospect of a substantial and viable energy source to meet our domestic needs now and in the future.”

The paper was drafted with the assistance of members of the chamber’s Legislative Affairs Committee and board of directors, according to Christian. It was distributed to Sen. George Edwards, Delegate Wendell Beitzel and The Greater Cumberland Committee.

The chamber represents more than 630 member firms, according to the paper. However, at least one of the firms that the chamber represents does not support the intent of the paper.

“I would like to go on record stating that we do not support this letter either in spirit, intent or content,” writes C.M. Herdering of Husky Power Dogsledding at Mountain MD Kennels, LLC. “Nor did we receive any request for input. Nor do we support ‘the expedited study of shale gas development,’ which the white paper proposes.”

The Legislative Affairs Committee is open to all members and every member had the opportunity to provide input, said Christian in an email to the Times-News.

“Is it too much to hope that the chamber withdraw this letter until after actually taking a poll of its members’ position on the subject?” writes Herdering. “I have no doubt … they can issue a more comprehensive and unbiased plan — a plan which balances growth, environmental safety and everyone’s quality of life.”

In other states where drilling has already occurred, communities have welcomed large increase in employment, which in turn spurs business growth and expansion; increase in tax revenues; and other tertiary activity, according to the paper. Landowners have also benefited in the form of leasing and royalty payments from gas drilling.

The Garrett County Farm Bureau has also voiced support for responsible, safe development of natural gas from shale and recognizes it as a potential revenue source, according to the paper.

“In a county where our largest source of revenue is from the recreation industry — those drawn by the beauty and contentment of our land — it astounds us that the chamber would support the massive industrialization that natural gas development would require,” writes Herdering. “There may be jobs and revenue created — but these are temporary jobs which leave a lasting and potentially irreparable scar on our landscape, way of life and tourism industry.”

It is estimated that the total maximum lifetime value of Marcellus shale play in Allegany County is $15.72 billion, and $32.4 billion in Garrett County, according to the paper. The Utica shale play is estimated to be even greater.

“The chamber recognizes that while shale gas development holds tremendous economic development potential, the growth of this industry also presents challenges, including strains on existing infrastructure as well as environmental impact concerns,” states the paper. “We cannot miss this incredible development opportunity and by working together we can ensure that shale gas development is handled correctly providing the greatest benefits with only minimal risks.”

Natural gas is difficult to extract from shale because the gas is trapped in tiny pores within the rock, according to the paper. Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) and horizontal drilling have made extracting commercially via-ble in recent years. Fracking has been used in the county since the 1950s by Texas Easter Gas Pipeline Co. with no apparent negative impact, according to the paper.

Although the process of fracking has been around for decades, the technique for fracturing shale rock is somewhat new and has been used on Marcellus shale in Pennsylvania, West Virginia and New York. Activity in Maryland has not occurred yet, pending the development of regulations, according to the paper. Allegany and Garrett counties are the only areas in the state with natural gas reserves in Marcellus shale, according to a previous Times-News article.

“For a community that is so environmentally conscious and touts sustainability, we believe that Garrett County is perfectly suited to be a leader in supplying natural gas to the Eastern continental United States,” states the paper.

“We further believe that Maryland has the leadership in place to ensure that responsible drilling of shale gas can take place utilizing known techniques and best practices in a safe and responsible manner.”

Contact Elaine Blaisdell at eblaisdell@times-news.com

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School board approves Garrett County budget for fiscal 2013

State action somewhat eases impact on employees

Elaine Blaisdell Cumberland Times-News

OAKLAND — The Garrett County Board of Education’s fiscal 2013 budget includes fewer cuts to school employees than the draft budget, some of whom were able to be brought back with the $1 million-plus from the state Budget Reconciliation and Financing Act, according to Charlotte Sebold, board president.

The board approved the $50 million budget at its business meeting earlier this month. Salaries, which make up 58 percent of the budget, are down $1.9 million for fiscal 2013 compared to salaries from this year, according to the budget.

Also, administration and mid-level administration expenditures, which combined make up 7.9 percent of the budget, are down by $64,963 for 2013 compared to fiscal 2012. Administration includes the activities associated with the general regulations, directions, and control of the Garrett County Public Schools and are generally those types of expenditures that execute educational or financial policy and affect the system as a whole, according to the budget.

Administration expenditures include board services; superintendent’s office; business support services; research, evaluation and information; human resources; and data processing services. Mid-level administration includes the administration and supervision of district-wide and school-level instructional programs and activities. Mid-level expenditures include the office of the president, Career & Technology Program Direction and Instructional Program Direction and Improvement.

The closing of Dennett Road and Kitzmiller elementary schools will save the board an anticipated $1.4 million, according to the board’s five-year plan. The Parents for Garrett County Education has filed an appeal with the state board and the county had until Wednesday to respond. If the schools were to reopen, the board would be $1.4 million short for fiscal 2014, interim Superintendent of Schools Sue Waggoner told the Times-News in May. Waggoner was unavailable to comment Wednesday and Thursday.

Some residents were concerned about transportation congestion. Students who attended Dennett Road Elementary will attend Yough Glades Elementary, which will become the special education center. Students who attended Kitzmiller will attend Broadford Elementary.

The fiscal 2013 operating budget calls for $55,000 in transportation upgrades at Southern Middle School, Broadford and Yough Glades.

The goals of the fiscal 2013 budget are to support and maintain educational programs, services and facilities; maintain staffing levels to support educational programs and services; and fund the approved capital improvement program.

The largest portion of the county’s fiscal 2013 budget allotted $26,023,714 to the board. That amount includes $664,714 to fund the teacher pension obligations, which was offset by a like amount from the state.

Contact Elaine Blaisdell at eblaisdell@times-news.com

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Zoning amendment angers Deep Creek Lake marina owners

Elaine Blaisdell Cumberland Times-News

OAKLAND — Despite opposition from multiple marinas at Deep Creek Lake, the Garrett County commissioners ap-proved an amendment to the Deep Creek Zoning Ordinance to add a new category for boat rentals as a separate service that would not offer any of the other services associated with a marina.

Upon suggestion of the planning commission and after receiving a request from Bill Meagher, owner of the Lakeside Creamery, to amend the ordinance, commissioners approved the amendment at their June 5 public meeting. Commissioners Gregan Crawford and Robert Gatto voted in favor of the amendment, with chairman Jim Raley opposing it. During a May 31 public hearing, Raley noted that he had concerns about Meagher’s decision not to offer services on-site.

Meagher plans to offer 12 personal water crafts and four pontoon boats as rentals as well as offer guided tours. He would use local marinas for services. After approaching the planning commission, he learned he would need a special exception to do so.

“We didn’t want to do sales, we didn’t want to do repairs, we didn’t want to do a lot of the things that the marina does. The only thing we wanted to do was a boat rental business,” Meagher said at the public hearing.

Ed Schofield, general manager of Deep Creek Lake Boat Rentals, noted during the hearing that Meagher’s decision to rely on the competition for services was perplexing.

“No way you can be part of this business and not have sales. You are kidding yourselves,” said Schofield.

Phil St. Moritz, owner and president of Bill’s Marine Service, indicated during the hearing that his business would not service Meagher’s boats.

“He (Meagher) said, ‘We are going to work with marinas.’ We are not going to service them,” said Moritz. “We are not going to launch them.”

St. Moritz noted that there are already too many boats in the water in that area with boat rentals from both Bill’s Marine Service and Deep Creek Marina, which provides rental operations to Will O’ the Wisp.

Meagher indicated that he could get services from Deep Creek Lake State Park and could hire a mechanic in-house. However, Meagher would have to go to a marina on the lake to purchase fuel or would have to fuel on-site.

“I want to work with the people here, but I get it if they are saying they don’t want to work with me,” said Meagher.

Silver Tree Marine, LLC and Patterson Boat Co. also opposed the amendment change, according to Carol Jacobs, president of Aquatic Center Inc., who also opposes the ordinance amendment.

“The marinas brought experts with decades of experience in the field of rentals and service, which were ignored by two of the three commissioners,” said Jacobs in an email to the Times-News. “Additionally, instead of obtaining a special exemption for his one property from the Zoning Appeals Board, he took a different route and requested a zoning ordinance amendment for all properties through the county commissioners. This means that several new boat rental operations can now be added to Deep Creek Lake without adequate parking, space, fuel and launching and service facilities, which will decrease public safety.”

During the hearing, Meagher indicated that Lakeside Creamery had 56 parking spaces that will fit all uses. Meagher said he heard all the concerns about safety and would take it under advisement.

“Our goal is that our customers and our guests would stay all on our property,” said Meagher. “We aren’t looking at them crossing the street. … Our goal was to provide another service to the community that our guests are looking to have. Our space is very similar to other spaces in size and parking. We do have the ability to accommodate our guests.”

Bob Nickle, general manager of Bill’s Marine Service, asked, “How can you say no to one and yes to another? It (zoning ordinance) is to govern growth in the Deep Creek watershed. If you keep making small amendments to it, it’s not worth the paper it’s written on. I don’t think it’s fair that someone is requesting to change the rules mid-stream.”

The commissioners also received four letters of opposition to the amendment in the ordinance, according to Raley.

“To grant this individual an exception would do little to benefit anyone other than the individual at the cost of unfairly penalizing those of us who are willing to comply with regulations,” wrote Brian C. O’Brien of Silver Tree Marine in an email to the commissioners.

Contact Elaine Blaisdell at eblaisdell@times-news.com

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Joanna Guy crowned Miss Maryland

Joanna Guy has been crowned Miss Maryland and will represent the state in the Miss America pageant next year.

Ms. Guy is well known locally for her many accomplishments including a number of academic achievements such as Maryland Distinguished Scholar. She also won the Miss Maryland Outstanding Teen contest in 2009.

Her aspirations include graduating from Cornell where she currently attends with a dual degree in political science and music. She hopes to serve us in the US Senate and sometime along the way, perform with the Capital Steps.

One former teacher, Doug Oxford from Southern High School, said “accomplishments like this do not happen over night. This is a culmination of a lot of hard work over many years. Certainly, Joanna demonstrates that dreams can come true for little girls from small towns and good things are likely to continue for Joanna.”

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Military explains Beltway UFO sighting

Bluefield Daily Telegraph

WASHINGTON — The nation’s capitol is already known for its heavy traffic, but even seasoned D.C. motorists were surprised when what looked like a UFO joined them on the Beltway.

Images of what looked like a classic flying saucer being hauled on a trailer flowed across the Internet soon after it was sighted June 13, according to MSNBC. The tractor trailer hauled the aircraft from Garrett County, Md. to Naval Air Station Patuxent River.

Military officials soon revealed that the strange craft was not a crashed UFO, but the new X-47B — an unmanned drone designed to take off and land on aircraft carriers. In the coming months, the drone will be flying over the base and the surrounding area along the Chesapeake Bay.

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Nominate Candidates for Garrett County's 2012 Most Beautiful Person

This year marks the 26th year of Maryland’s You Are Beautiful program. Each county establishes how they wish to celebrate volunteer efforts in their county. The mission of the program is to promote local community—living, working, and playing together for a better tomorrow.

Celebrating 26 years honoring volunteers in Maryland, The Maryland You are Beautiful Program, in conjunction with the Governor’s Office of Service and Volunteerism, and Maryland Life, is now accepting nominations for the 26th Annual “Maryland’s Most Beautiful People” Volunteer Awards. The deadline for nominations is August 24, 2012.

Each year the pubic is invited to nominate individuals or groups that have made significant contributions to communities through their unpaid volunteer efforts. A local committee then chooses GC’s Most Beautiful Person.

All nominees for Garrett County will be recognized by the Board of County Commissioners at a local award ceremony. One nominee will represent the County at a statewide ceremony and dinner in Baltimore later in the year.

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