Search and Rescue Team made official

The Garrett County Republican

OAKLAND — With procedures and agreements in place, the Garrett County Search and Rescue Team was introduced to the county commissioners Monday.

John Frank, director of advanced level emergency management for Garrett County Emergency Services, presented the SAR team at the commissioners’ meeting and outlined its role.

“The Search and Rescue Team — Company Six — is actually for ground searches to where you need trained individuals for adverse terrain, rocky terrain, steep terrain. They may possibly search at night,” Frank said.

Searches may be complicated by the lost person, who may have medical problems or have mental issues — like Alzheimer’s — that may prevent them from realizing that they’re lost, or may prompt them to hide from their rescuers, Frank said.

“This has been a long time coming for Special Operations,” Frank said, as the search team officially is now a part of the Special Operations Teams in Garrett County. Special Operations falls under the coordination of Emergency Management and the emergency operations plan, he said.

The team has been operating for years, but began heading toward a formalized status this summer, with agreements needed among the county’s 11 fire companies and four emergency medical services. As an official team, it also will be easier to dispatch its members for mutual aid in incidents outside Garrett County, Frank said.

Membership in the team requires the approval of the chief of the applicant’s department, Frank said, as well as extensive training in areas such as land navigation. The basic search and rescue training requires 16 hours, but many in the group have trained for more than 80 hours.

Although it’s the latest addition to the Special Operations Teams, search-and-rescue members are no strangers to interdepartmental cooperation.

The Swiftwater Rescue Team has approximately 25 members hailing from several departments, while the Hazmat Team has 28 technicians throughout the county.

Outside of the teams, departments have their own specialized equipment and trained members that can be made available county-wide.

The Deep Creek and Deer Park departments coordinate a dive team that has membership from other fire companies, so 30 certified divers can respond to emergencies. The Eastern Garrett department has a relief truck that can be brought to the scene of large incidents to offer food and drink to firefighters. And numerous companies have purchased specialized equipment, rope gear, boats and all-terrain vehicles, Frank said.

To read the full article click here.

Lake Effect: Revisting the Genius Mountain Maryland Visit of Albert Einstein — From Allegany Magazine’s January 2022 edition

Allegany Magazine

Many people consider Albert Einstein the smartest man who ever lived. Yet when this man who knew almost everything needed to unwind one warm season during the war, the vacation spot he smartly chose was in the Mountains of Maryland — Deep Creek Lake to be more specific.

Einstein vacationed for two weeks in September 1946 at the lake. He was seeking a place where he could find escape from the unwanted media that wrote about how his theories had led to the creation of the atomic bomb. That giant brain needed a rest. Even people who are considered the smartest of all time get criticized, as it turns out.

And John Steiding – a resident of Midland here in Allegany County invited Einstein to take a vacation at the lake. Steiding was a chemist at the Celanese plant at the time and came to know Einstein through a co-worker’s wife, who was sculpting the great man’s bust.

“Einstein, who wasn’t very tall, found it uncomfortable to pose for the artwork since his feet would not touch the floor. Steiding, being a handyman, made a footstool for Einstein,” according to Francis Tam in an article called “Einstein in Western Maryland.”

Besides being able to relax out of the national spotlight for a while, Einstein was also able to have Dr. Frank Wilson examine him for an aneurysm of the aorta of the abdomen. And this news also could be kept from the prying public eyes – and a news media at the time that was looking for any reason at all to be critical of the man.

Einstein stayed at Dr. Wilson’s lake cottage, named the “Mar-Jo-Lodge” for two weeks. “He took daily walks along the lake, frequently stopping to chat with strangers who had no idea who he was. He was sometimes seen fishing and also bird-watching with binoculars. He never skipped a meal but was a light eater. He drank a lot of water and lemonade; his favorite vegetable was fresh corn-on-the-cob from Garrett County,” Tam wrote.

In particular, Einstein loved sailing, either with friends or alone.

“During one of his many hours spent on the lake with Steiding, Einstein remarked that ‘here you can get nearer to God,’” reported the Cumberland News.

Born in 1879, Einstein was a German theoretical physicist, widely credited to be one of the greatest physicists of all time. He is best known for developing the theory of relativity, but he also made important contributions to the development of the theory of quantum mechanics. Relativity and quantum mechanics are together the two pillars of modern physics. “E = mc2” — which arises from his relativity theory, has been dubbed “the world’s most famous equation.” Einstein received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics “for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect.” a pivotal step in the development of quantum theory.

As word began to get out that the great Albert Einstein was vacationiong at Maryland’s “Best Kept Secret,” people began to look for him – hoping to run into the man, chat, take a photo or get an autograph. On these days, when he knew he was being sought after as a celebrity, Einstein sought solace on the water.

“People would realize that he wasn’t around, go searching for him, and find him in Harry Muma’s little sailboat, ‘single-handing,’ on the Turkey Neck inlet,” according to the Garrett County Historical Society’s “Deep Creek Lake, Past and Present.”

During a visit, Steiding’s brother Fred asked Einstein to explain his famous theory of relativity in layman’s terms.

“Put it this way,” reportedly said Einstein, “If you sit on a park bench with your sweetheart, an hour seems like a minute. If you sit on a hot stove by mistake, a minute seems like an hour.”

Einstein later said that his vacation at Deep Creek Lake was “one of the most restful and zestful vacations.”

When the vacation ended, Einstein showed himself to be a generous guest, giving Blair Thompson, who had attended him during the vacation, a $50 gratuity, which would equate to more than $1,000 today.

Following the vacation, he was back to work. In October of that year, he wrote that the United Nations should “form a world government that maintained peace under the threat of nuclear devastation,” according to Ze’ev Rosenkranz in “The Einstein Scrapbook.” Einstein also published his papers on his unified field theory in the 1950s.

On April 17 1955, Albert Einstein experienced internal bleeding caused by the rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm – the same one that caused him seek refuge in Garrett County nine years before. The condition had also been reinforced surgically by Dr. Rudolph Nissen in 1948. Einstein took the draft of a speech he was preparing for a television appearance commemorating the state of Israel’s seventh anniversary with him to the hospital, but he did not live to complete it.

Einstein refused surgery, saying, “I want to go when I want. It is tasteless to prolong life artificially. I have done my share; it is time to go. I will do it elegantly.” And so he did. Einstein died in Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center on April 18, 1955 at the age of 76.

To the world, Einstein’s vacation at Deep Creek Lake remained a secret until a reporter with the Cumberland News interviewed Robbie Steiding – the son of John Stieding – and published the story of the visit in 1979.

Top 14 Deep Creek Lake Winter Activities For Non-Skiers

Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations & Sales Blog

t’s a common conundrum – what’s a non-skier to do when friends and family are hitting the slopes at Wisp Resort? Deep Creek Lake winter activities offers lots of options that can keep every member of your crew entertained. It’s a great way to enjoy a weekend getaway near Pittsburgh, Baltimore, or Washington, DC.

Here are just a few of our favorite Deep Creek Lake winter activities for the non-skiers staying at a Deep Creek Lake vacation rental:

Deep Creek Lake winter activities

Hiking at Swallow Falls State Park
Crisp white snow makes this beautiful place even more spectacular, and it’s definitely a must see throughout all four seasons. If you’re up for some serious hiking, explore trails to all three of the waterfalls – Swallow Falls, Muddy Creek Falls, and Tolliver Falls. There is also a handicap accessible trail and view platform at Muddy Creek Falls for those that need an easier route or just want to take a short stroll. Be sure to bring your camera and wear sturdy hiking shoes or boots. Trails can be slippery during the winter months. Get more info.

Simon Pearce Tours
Watch master glassblowers at work, then shop for the beautiful items they make in the retail store. You can also choose from a wide variety of second-quality glass. Located in Mountain Lake Park, it is just a short drive from most Deep Creek Lake vacation rentals. Find out more.

Guided Snowshoe Tours
Weather permitting, All Earth Eco Tours offers another great way to experience Swallow Falls State Park. Their snowshoe tours are a “no experience required” way to cruise through the woods and take in the scenery. For those seeking high adventure, ask about their trips to Big Savage Mountain and Lost Lands.

Sleigh Rides at Deep Creek Lake

Sleigh Rides
One of the classic Deep Creek Lake winter activities, you can take a ride back in time as you swish through open fields and over hills listening to the sound of muffled hoof beats in the snow. Sleigh rides at Pleasant Valley Dream Rides are an ideal way to enjoy the outdoors no matter what your age.

Cold Drinks By a Warm Fire
Get cozy by the fire place at local restaurants like Firewater Kitchen & Bar, Uno Chicago Grill or Dutch’s at Silver Tree, and warm-up with your favorite beverage.

Sled Riding at Blackwater Falls State Park
Within one hour of the Deep Creek Lake area, you’ll find the ultimate sledding hill! Head to Blackwater Falls State Park to ride up on a conveyor, sled to the bottom, and repeat! Bring your own sled or rent one on-site.

Sample Award Winning Cheeses
Stop by Firefly Farms in nearby Accident, to check out their award winning goat cheese and browse their selection of gourmet foods. They can even make you a personalized cheese board to go.

Cross Country Skiing
With minimal instruction, you can kick and glide on cross country ski trails at Herrington Manor State Park and New Germany State Park. Call ahead to check for availability of rental equipment.

Shops & Antiques
Avoid the cold temperatures when you visit area shops and antique stores. Schoolhouse Earth, Bear Creek Traders, A Mountain Fix, and High Mountain Sports are a few of our favorites at the lake. Take a short drive to Oakland to browse antiques at Englander’s or Cabin Fever. While you are there, hit up Flipside Sounds – a vinyl shop in downtown Oakland.

Deep Creek Axe Throwing Co.
Test your skills in the Deep Creek Lake axe throwing arena! This fun indoor activity is suitable for ages 8 and up.

Museum Tours
When visiting Oakland, history buffs should stop at the two museums operated by the Garrett County Historical Society. Return to the past as you explore area treasures, learn about early settlers, and check out Model T Fords. Call for hours of operation.

Snow Tubing & Mountain Coaster Rides
Wisp Resort is well-known for skiing, but they also offer a variety of activities that anyone can enjoy. Reserve a snow tubing session or take a ride on the mountain coaster.

Arcades
Everyone in your group will enjoy playing a wide variety arcade games and snacking on great food at Deep Creek Fun Zone.

Deep Creek Lake Discovery Center
Fun for kids of all ages, the Discovery Center is a one-of-a-kind environmental center with hands-on exhibits that showcase the natural resources of Western Maryland. Open weekends during the winter season.

Maryland property values rise 12 percent

The Garrett County Republican

BALTIMORE — The Maryland Department of Assessments and Taxation has announced its 2022 reassessment of 704,430 “Group 1” residential and commercial properties.

In Maryland, there are more than 2 million property accounts that are split into three groups, each appraised once every three years. The overall statewide increase for “Group 1” properties was 12% over the past three years according to SDAT.

The overall statewide increase was higher than 2020’s 8.1% increase. This represents an average increase in value of 12.7% for all residential properties and 9.7% for all commercial properties over the three-year period since the last Group 1 reassessment in 2019.

“All 23 counties and Baltimore City experienced an increase in residential property values for the fourth consecutive year, while commercial property values increased in 22 counties and Baltimore City. This is a good indicator that the market remains strong and growth is steady here in Maryland,” SDAT Director Michael Higgs said.

“The department’s real property assessors continue to work hard work to ensure that all of Maryland’s properties are assessed uniformly and fairly. As part of our Tax Credit Awareness Campaign, each reassessment notice includes information about the Homeowners’ and Homestead Tax Credits, which save Marylanders more than $260 million in taxes each year,” he said.

The 2022 assessments for Group 1 properties were based on an evaluation of 74,673 sales that occurred within the group over the last three years. If the reassessment resulted in a property value being adjusted, any increase in value will be phased-in equally over the next three years, while any decrease in value will be fully implemented for the July 1, 2022, tax bill.

For the 2022 reassessment, 93.9% of Group 1 residential properties saw an increase in property value.

The Homeowners’ Tax Credit provides relief for eligible homeowners by setting a limit on the amount of property taxes that are owed based on their income. Residential property owners who complete a one-time application and meet certain eligibility requirements can also receive a Homestead Tax Credit, which limits their principal residence’s taxable assessment from increasing by more than a certain percentage each year regardless of their income level.

To read the full article click here.