Commissioners hold public hearing on DCL water service boundaries

OAKLAND — The Garrett County commissioners and the Department of Public Works —Utilities Division held a public hearing Monday afternoon at the courthouse on water district boundary changes at Deep Creek Lake.

“We are proposing to change the Thayerville and McHenry water service boundaries to include a small section of Deep Creek Drive between the Rt. 219 bridge over Deep Creek Lake and Gravelly Run Road,” said Pat Hudnall, Utilities Division chief.

The county also wants to combine the two districts into one, which would be called the Deep Creek Lake Water Service Area.

Hudnall noted that ad valorem tax rates will be affected. McHenry customers are currently paying $.05 per $100 of assessed value on improved and unimproved property. For Thayerville, the cost is $.24 per $100 of assessed value.

“Once combined, the tax rate will be $.10 per $100 of assessed property value on improved and unimproved parcels across both service areas,” Hudnall said. “This would take effect in next year’s tax cycle.”

He indicated that combining the two systems, in part, was in preparation for the Hoyes Run Road project, which is two to three years from being constructed, and to provide an additional water source for McHenry.

“MDE (Maryland Department of the Environment) is going to view this as an alternative water source/supply for the McHenry system, should we run into issues with the Hoyes Run project down the road,” Hudnall said.

He stressed, however, that the new Deep Creek Lake Water Service Area would only be a possible backup for Hoyes Run, not a substitute for that project.

“It will only supplement what we need,” Hudnall said. “This won’t carry enough water to meet all of our demands in McHenry.”

Commissioner Paul Edwards indicated ad valorem rate changes, therefore, are inevitable.

Two people voiced their opinions at the hearing. Del. Wendell Beitzel asked that the county extend the proposed Deep Creek Lake Water Service Area boundary up to the intersection of Rt. 219 and Rt. 42. This would enable the Maryland State Police barrack and Northern Garrett Rescue Squad to connect to the system if they so desired.

“Please consider it,” Beitzel asked the commissioners.

McHenry water customer Robert Kelly reviewed the history of the original McHenry Water System expansion project. In 2011, he noted the ad valorem tax rate was expected to be between $.02 and $.04 per $100 of his assessed property.

“The residents were overwhelmingly opposed to the expansion of the system in 2011,” Kelly said, referring to a public hearing in which 200 people attended.

Kelly estimated that he is actually currently paying a $.13 ad valorem tax rate, or $717.47, a year. Under the new proposed rate, that would go up to $1,200 a year.

“We, the residents of McHenry, just get crucified,” he said about continual increases in water rates and other taxes. “It’s got to stop. There has to be innovate thinking to deal with this issue.”

He acknowledged that a $.02 to $.04 ad valorem rate was probably not realistic now. But he did suggest that a moratorium be placed on all Public Works projects until a financial study could be conducted by an independent company.

“I’m not opposed to this,” Kelly said about expanding the water system. “What I’m opposed to is my $717 going to a $1,200.”

He called conducting the independent study a “confidence builder.”

“I have no faith, and most people don’t have any faith, in the numbers thrown out, as you can see, by the Public Works department,” Kelly said.

The commissioners left the comment period open on the proposed McHenry and Thayerville water service boundary changes until Monday, Aug. 21. Maps of the areas are available for viewing online at garrettcounty.org.

The commissioners will hold their next public meeting on Tuesday, Aug. 22, at the Ryan’s Glade Community Center, Gorman, at 6 p.m.

For more info, click here.

Vacation-home market booms in Maryland and Virginia

The robust housing landscape in Washington exists for more than just primary residences. A number of second-home markets have seen an increase in popularity in the past few years across a wide variety of destinations — from waterfront communities to mountain retreats.

We’re take a closer look at three such markets that are showing clear signs of increased demand among Washingtonians seeking a getaway.

The Eastern Shore of Maryland
Maryland’s picturesque Eastern Shore has long been a second-home destination for Mid-Atlantic city dwellers, but its popularity has reached new heights within the past two years.

Homes on the Eastern Shore are selling in half the amount of time that they were when the country was coming out of the recession, with median days on the market dropping from more than 100 in most months of the year from 2007 to 2013. Now, the days on the market is more likely to be under 75, even hitting a record low of 45 in June 2016 and 46 in May.

The number of closed sales per month keeps climbing on the Eastern Shore, with even the winter months of the past two years seeing approximately the same number of sales as the peak spring selling months of just a few years prior. While there’s an active market, the area still provides value.

The median sales price for homes here has stayed steadily between $200,000 and $250,000 for the past nine years. However, with all other indicators showing a return to demand, we expect prices to increase over the next year or two.

Shenandoah County, Va.
For those looking for an escape near the mountains, the Shenandoah region’s real estate market is showing signs of renewed strength. The number of active listings has plummeted, even though the number of new listings coming on the market has stayed roughly the same for the past several years.

This trend suggests that although new listings are coming onto the market, they are selling quickly and therefore don’t remain active for long. Every month for the past two and a half years, the number of active listings has decreased compared with the same month for the year prior and, more notable, the size of the decrease has grown to percentages in the double digits over the past year.

Correspondingly, the number of days on the market has started to tick downward, moving from 100 in the past two years and staying under 80 for the majority of months. Median sales prices have also trended upward over the past year, settling in around $175,000 this past spring.

This is part of the slow but steady climb from the low point during 2010, when prices were closer to $125,000, after reaching peaks of more than $250,000 during the boom years around 2007.

Garrett County, Md.
One location Washingtonians should keep an eye on is Garrett County, Md. Approximately three hours from Washington, this county borders West Virginia and contains Deep Creek Lake — the largest man-made lake in Maryland. Fly-fishing, boating and white-water rafting are common summer activities, and during the winter Wisp Resort attracts skiers and snowboarders to the slopes.

This region has started to show all the signs of a market on the cusp of becoming highly competitive. Prices have made a noticeable rebound by crossing the $300,000 mark (after a few post-recession years when they dipped to $150,000), and the median days the on market has dropped by more than a half, from more than 200 just a few years ago to as low as 54 in July 2016.

The surest sign that this market is getting hot is that homes are just now getting back to the point of selling close to their asking prices. After a few years when sellers were getting only about 80 to 85 percent of their asking price, Garrett County has crossed into the 95 percent category. This shows that buyers are more motivated than ever to own a home in this community.

With median prices well below those of homes in the Washington region, all three of these markets are poised for growth, and properties in these areas could be a wise investment for the right buyer. Local real estate agents can help identify the best neighborhoods and specific properties, and talk more in detail about these recent trends.

They can help you find the right vacation home at the right price, especially when shopping for a home from out of town.

The fact that a number of second-home destinations continue to see a rise in popularity is yet another sign of renewed health for the housing market in and around Washington. Whether it is mountain trails or the water’s edge that appeals to a vacation-home buyer, our region has a tremendous variety for everyone across the price spectrum.

For more info, click here.

 

61st annual Garrett County Ag Fair scheduled for July 29–Aug. 5

McHENRY — Although there have been various fairs and carnivals held in Garrett County for at least a century, the contemporary Garrett County Agriculture Fair will observe its 61st anniversary this year, with the 2017 event scheduled for Saturday, July 29, through Saturday, Aug. 5.

The fair will once again consist of a myriad of competitions, ranging from the judging of farm animals and their caretakers to canned goods to photography to 4-H projects. There will be tractor pulls and a baby crawling contest, live entertainment on the Exhibit Hall stage every evening, and Reithoffer Shows will provide a wide variety of rides and amusements.

In addition, numerous service organizations, churches, and other nonprofit entities will have various food and beverage items for sale, and the fair will conclude with the annual Garrett County Livestock Sale.

Among the musical entertainers throughout the week will be Russel Dickerson, Tim Litvin, Sundance Head, the Joseph Sisters, and HeartStrings.

Much of opening day, Saturday, July 29, will be spent entering all indoor exhibits, and the Reithoffer Shows carnival rides will run from 5 to 11 p.m. that evening.

Judging of exhibits will be conducted all day on Sunday, July 30, with the barns closed to traffic, and the entering of horses and marketing animals will be conducted throughout the day, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The day will culminate with an interdenominational worship service at 6:30 p.m., followed by the crowning of the 2017 GC Farm Queen at 7:30 p.m.

All exhibit barns will be open to the public beginning at 10 a.m. Monday, the carnvial rides will be open until 11 p.m., and various contests/competitions will be held throughout the day.

Tuesday will be Senior Citizens Day, with free admission granted for those age 60 and older. Seniors may ride midway attractions free from 1 until 5 p.m. The day’s schedule will also include a pet show, a 4-H robotics challenge, a high school junior rodeo, and a performance by the Still Kickin’ Cloggers.

The Wednesday slate will include a baby crawl and judging in various animal categories.

A pedal tractor pull, 4-H/FFA beef showmanship judging, a market beef show, and a heavyweight tractor pull will be among Thursday’s events, with Friday’s schedule including the master showman competition, 4-H engineering events, the costume animal parade, cow patty bingo, mechanical bull riding, and peewee swine show.

The final day of the fair — Saturday, Aug. 5 — will include the Livestock Olympics, a dirty-pony contest, the annual livestock sale, the four- and eight-cylinder demolition derby on the fair track.

The cost of admission to the fair on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Saturday (July 29) is $10, which covers unlimited carnival rides, entertainment, and track events. The admission price for Thursday and Saturday (Aug. 5) is $15, which covers the same items noted above. Non-ride tickets, which must be purchased in advance ($7), include entertainment and track events, but not carnival rides. The non-ride tickets can be purchased at First United Bank & Trust in McHenry, Grantsville, and Friendsville; Slopeside Market, Deep Creek Shop and Save; all First Peoples locations; Double G Ranch; Southern States in Mountain Lake Park; and Gregg’s Pharmacy in Oakland.

More information can be found on the fair website at garrettcountyfair.org.

The Garrett County Agriculture Fair is a non-profit organization that is led by a 24-member all-volunteer board of directors.

 For more info, click here.

NEW LISTING- 508 Lake Forest Drive

Peaceful wooded waterfront with gentle slope to lake offers deep-water Type A private dock.

Enjoy four-season beauty of the lake, sun and moonrises by a wood-burning fireplace or from the expansive lakeside deck.

Architect/Owner incorporated natural cedar and dry-stacked stone into low-maintenance design; 3 master suites (4BR/4.5BA), ample parking and hot tub ~rental-ready~ if desired!

Must see!

For more info, click here.

 

NEW LISTING- 3067 Shingle Camp Road

Check out my new listing on Shingle Camp Road!

Type A dock, deep water. Covered lakefront porch allows for plenty of time outdoors.

Must-see custom lakefront home with additional carriage house above detached garage. 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms.

Gourmet kitchen, picturesque fireplace and high efficiency heating and cooling systems.

For more info, click here.

 

 

Testimonial Tuesday

In short : Jay Ferguson and Taylor-Made Real Estate are the best! Jay sold our home in record time and made it a great experience to boot.

From day one Jay told us ” I am going to sell your home,” and there was an offer on the table less than 8 hours after the house was listed. Jay did his homework. He had a thorough understanding of pricing trends and of the strengths of our unique development before the unit went on the market.

The results : our unit sold faster than almost any other house in our community that had been listed over the past five years and it sold at a higher price than most if not all of those same units.

Jay and his wonderful, friendly staff at Taylor-Made have created a digital marketing juggernaut. They take the time to get it right the first time and are very effective in making sure potential buyers will easily find your home’s listing online with accurate information on well designed, eye-catching web pages.

Jay is honest and straightforward. Jay never made a promise he did not deliver on. Jay is an expert negotiator and we always felt he was looking out for our best interest first. Jay very patiently walked us through all the steps we needed to sell our home. Jay was readily available to answer any questions or to update us on any developments regarding our contract. Jay’s knowledge and acumen are second to none. He is just a great upbeat guy and a pleasure to work with. He is also a cool cucumber. Selling a home can be a stressful situation at times but thanks to Jay’s people skills he always kept things on an even keel.

His excellent support staff (including Megan, Susan and Allie) were also tremendously helpful and friendly. Everything Jay does is deliberate and has purpose. Jay is truly there to serve his clients and exceed his client’s expectations which he definitely did in our case.

I would recommend Jay to anyone who is considering selling their home. Jay is one of the hardest working, most positive, talented professionals we have had the pleasure to work with in any field. While there are a lot of great agents in Western Maryland Jay is in a class of his own. We were blessed to have him in our corner and I promise you will feel the same if you choose Jay to sell your home.” – Rob Paine

 

Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations & Sales Raises Money for Local Animal Charity

Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations & Sales is a leading vacation rental and real estate firm located in McHenry, MD. With a strong commitment to the local community, their team is involved in a wide variety of charitable activities through sponsorship, donations and volunteer work throughout the year.

In May of 2017, Taylor-Made owners and members of the Deep Creek Lake real estate team broke out their bartending skills to host a Guest Bartender Night at JG’s Pub to benefit HART for Animals, a local non-profit with a mission to improve the condition of animals in Western Maryland. Their adoption center has become a model for compassionate animal rescue.

Lots of members of the Taylor-Made Deep Creek staff were on hand as servers or to help with the silent auction and raffles. The company has partnered with Kate and Fred Collins, JG’s Pub owners, on this event for over ten years. They are always happy to roll up their sleeves for HART for Animals. The event was a huge success raising over $2,300.

Later that month, staff stepped-up to support the Adopt-A-Road program in Garrett County. Members of every department at Taylor-Made volunteered their time to pick up litter prior to the busy summer season on the four “adopted” roads.

“A strong commitment to community plays a key role in our company culture,” stated Jodi Taylor Refosco, Owner. “It strengthens our team and benefits the Deep Creek Lake area as a whole.”

Taylor-Made is family owned and operated by Jodi Taylor Refosco, her husband, Joe Refosco, and her brother Chad Taylor. Betsy Spiker Holcomb and Jay Ferguson are co-owners of the real estate company that was started in 2014.

With over 370 homes, Taylor-Made is the largest vacation rental management company at Deep Creek Lake. Their sister Deep Creek Lake real estate company has become the fastest growing brokerage in the area in recent years.

About Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations & Sales

Taylor-Made Deep Creek Vacations & Sales has become a frontrunner in Deep Creek Lake vacation rentals, real estate, and property services. Taylor-Made rental homes and sales listings are conveniently located within a few hour’s drive from Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and Washington, DC.

 

NEW LISTING- 98 Red Pine Road

Check out my listing on Red Pine Road!

 

 

 

One level living! Well-maintained home in McHenry with many improvements, including a paved driveway, a detached garage/shed with electric, and a spacious front deck. 3 large bedrooms and 2 full baths, and a ton of storage space in the attic.

Central AC and a heat pump offer incredible comfort and efficiency. Furnishings negotiable. Original owner.

Very private setting & DCL is about a mile away!

 

For more information, click here.