Plans for new animal shelter moving forward

State-of-the art care, adoption facility in planning phase

Jeffrey Alderton Cumberland Times-News

CUMBERLAND — The dream of having a new, modern animal shelter in Allegany County drew a bit closer to reality Monday.

“We have contracted Stoiber and Associates for this project and we’re very excited about having this opportunity to proceed,” said Becky McClarran, an officer of the Allegany County Animal Shelter Management Foundation.

Stoiber and Associates officials met Monday with McClarran and Karl Brubaker, director of the Allegany County Animal Shelter, to further discuss the project that would create a state-of-the-art animal care and adoption facility. The current shelter is located on a 3 1/2-acre site on Furnace Street. A new facility could be built there, or somewhere else in the county if a more suitable location became available through donated land.

The exact cost of the new animal shelter is not yet known but the project will be funded by private donations.

Stoiber and Associates has extensive experience in the animal shelter world, having led the way in the renovation of the 6-year-old Washington Animal Rescue League facility in Washington.

Members of the Allegany County Animal Shelter Management Foundation visited the D.C. facility before signing on with Stoiber and Associates

Local foundation members also met with officials in Garrett County where the new HART animal shelter is under construction near Garrett College.

The 12,000-square-foot facility in Garrett County will be constructed at a projected cost of about $1.8 million. The log-cabin style structure situated on county property will feature separate wings for hospital administration, a pet hotel where fundraisers can be held and the shelter.

Positive changes at the Allegany County Animal Shelter in the last couple of years have brought the foundation to the point where it can now pursue funding and building a new animal shelter.

“We have gone from an 85 percent kill facility to a 92 percent no-kill facility. That is phenomenal but we are at the very limits of what our shelter can do,” said McClarran.

The 5,000-square-foot animal shelter on Furnace Street was constructed in 1998 with the last addition built in 2008. Kennels are situated outside and all dogs are brought inside at night.

Monday, there were about 55 dogs at the shelter and 130 cats, Brubaker said.

“The animal shelter was never designed to do what we are asking it to do,” he said. “As our organization evolves, the one thing that has held us back is our facility. We have to fight it every day.”

A new animal shelter would provide even better care and modern accommodations for its animal populations.

Jeff Stoiber said he is impressed with the level of commitment and dedication he has met in his contact with the local animal shelter community.

Dave Williams and his business partner, McClarran, noted the outpouring of community support that has benefited the shelter since a new director was brought in and other changes were made.

“There are a lot of partnerships in place. This community clearly loves its animals,” said McClarran, citing the constant activity of the social network Facebook and other developments, such as a steady stream of donations that were made to the shelter Christmas Eve.

“This community has a growing desire to help whatever the situation may be,” said Brubaker.

Going to a no-kill facility was another positive change that has brought the animal care community to the point where it needs and requires a new animal care shelter.

Stoiber’s company has also bought into the project literally. “We are donating up to a third of the cost of this project to get it going,” he said.

“Getting it off the ground is usually the toughest part. This is more than a revenue stream for us. This is something we love. It is very rewarding.”

Once the new facility is in place, the foundation will oversee the shelter with county support. “We will have a far more active role,” said McClarran.

Stoiber said he will provide architectural renderings of the shelter to the foundation by May 1 that will allow fundraising to formally begin.

“Right now we are getting information as to what the goals of this organization are, determining what the needs are and what locations are available. Then we come back with site plans, floor plans and architectural renderings,” said Stoiber.

A few donations have already been received by the nonprofit shelter. Contributions may be made to the Allegany County Shelter Foundation and are tax-deductible.

For more information, contact McClarran at 301-724-2453.

Contact Jeffrey Alderton at CUMBERLAND — The dream of having a new, modern animal shelter in Allegany County drew a bit closer to reality Monday.

“We have contracted Stoiber and Associates for this project and we’re very excited about having this opportunity to proceed,” said Becky McClarran, an officer of the Allegany County Animal Shelter Management Foundation.

Stoiber and Associates officials met Monday with McClarran and Karl Brubaker, director of the Allegany County Animal Shelter, to further discuss the project that would create a state-of-the-art animal care and adoption facility. The current shelter is located on a 3 1/2-acre site on Furnace Street. A new facility could be built there, or somewhere else in the county if a more suitable location became available through donated land.

The exact cost of the new animal shelter is not yet known but the project will be funded by private donations.

Stoiber and Associates has extensive experience in the animal shelter world, having led the way in the renovation of the 6-year-old Washington Animal Rescue League facility in Washington.

Members of the Allegany County Animal Shelter Management Foundation visited the D.C. facility before signing on with Stoiber and Associates

Local foundation members also met with officials in Garrett County where the new HART animal shelter is under construction near Garrett College.

The 12,000-square-foot facility in Garrett County will be constructed at a projected cost of about $1.8 million. The log-cabin style structure situated on county property will feature separate wings for hospital administration, a pet hotel where fundraisers can be held and the shelter.

Positive changes at the Allegany County Animal Shelter in the last couple of years have brought the foundation to the point where it can now pursue funding and building a new animal shelter.

“We have gone from an 85 percent kill facility to a 92 percent no-kill facility. That is phenomenal but we are at the very limits of what our shelter can do,” said McClarran.

The 5,000-square-foot animal shelter on Furnace Street was constructed in 1998 with the last addition built in 2008. Kennels are situated outside and all dogs are brought inside at night.

Monday, there were about 55 dogs at the shelter and 130 cats, Brubaker said.

“The animal shelter was never designed to do what we are asking it to do,” he said. “As our organization evolves, the one thing that has held us back is our facility. We have to fight it every day.”

A new animal shelter would provide even better care and modern accommodations for its animal populations.

Jeff Stoiber said he is impressed with the level of commitment and dedication he has met in his contact with the local animal shelter community.

Dave Williams and his business partner, McClarran, noted the outpouring of community support that has benefited the shelter since a new director was brought in and other changes were made.

“There are a lot of partnerships in place. This community clearly
loves its animals,” said McClarran, citing the constant activity of the social network Facebook and other developments, such as a steady stream of donations that were made to the shelter Christmas Eve.

“This community has a growing desire to help whatever the situation may be,” said Brubaker.

Going to a no-kill facility was another positive change that has brought the animal care community to the point where it needs and requires a new animal care shelter.

Stoiber’s company has also bought into the project literally. “We are donating up to a third of the cost of this project to get it going,” he said.

“Getting it off the ground is usually the toughest part. This is more than a revenue stream for us. This is something we love. It is very rewarding.”

Once the new facility is in place, the foundation will oversee the shelter with county support. “We will have a far more active role,” said McClarran.

Stoiber said he will provide architectural renderings of the shelter to the foundation by May 1 that will allow fundraising to formally begin.

“Right now we are getting information as to what the goals of this organization are, determining what the needs are and what locations are available. Then we come back with site plans, floor plans and architectural renderings,” said Stoiber.

A few donations have already been received by the nonprofit shelter. Contributions may be made to the Allegany County Shelter Foundation and are tax-deductible.

For more information, contact McClarran at 301-724-2453.

Contact Jeffrey Alderton at jlalderton@times-news.com.

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